September flowers


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I re-arranged my greenhouse last weekend and discovered that I have loads of space that I can still fill up with orchids! What a relief! For a while there I thought I was reaching my critical threshold there and it would just not do. There are still so many, many, plants left to buy, see, smell and successfully re-flower!

It is spring-time in the greenhouse and a lot of the plants are definitely waking up after a winter slumber.

I’ll take you on a small greenhouse tour and give you an update on what’s happening in the main orchid families represented in my collection.

 

I have one ascocenda and it’s a spiking and the vanda ‘Spotted Sunshine’ x “Motes butterscotch’ is flowering for the first time.

Not sure what is going on with this one, it has some brown…burn mark or old rot on the lip.

I’ve got some weird fascination for vandaenopsis (vanda x phalaenopsis) and since my white monster-phal is still in bloom I pollinated one of the vanda flowers. It will be interesting to see if it is successful in the next couple of months.

All the angraecoids are doing well at the moment. They’re all growing new leaves and some also new leaves. It looks like the Angraecum Ruthenbergianum is growing a couple of basal keikis and the Aerangis biloba is into total re-vamp mode. When I bought it, it looked…sick. The leaves had a strange brownish tint and they have been deteriorating ever since. A couple of them have fallen off by now, and it looks like all the leaves the plant came with when I bought it are dying. So it’s a good thing that the plant has decided to make several new fans/basal keikis.

Aerangis biloba

Aerangis biloba

 

One of the reasons why I all of a sudden got loads of space in the greenhouse was the discovery of some suitable light-weight metal grids perfect for hanging shelves. After those got hung up in suitable spots in the greenhouse, my benches are almost empty. One one of those new shelves, I’ve got a bunch of newly acquired phalaenopsis plants. Several of them have spikes growing, but only two are in flower at the moment.

 

 

I have one Coelogyne in my collection and although it was a NoID for some time, it has been identified as a lawrenceana. Once it flowered it was easy to make a proper identification. This is a fragrant flower and the whole greenhouse smells like honey in the morning. It’s generally nice with scented flowers (except if they are bulbophyllums and mindblowingly disgusting!), but I find that the lawrenceana fragrance is not a big hit with me. It’s too sweet and sugary. I do however, despite the honey perfume, really like this plant. It has a lot of new growths coming and also a lot of new buds developing. They say this plant only flower once per year, and that it obviously in August/September in my case. I’m looking at the small, but still clearly visible buds, and it’s somewhat crazy to think that they’re going to be developing for a whole year before they’re ready to flower. It’s not unlikely though…because I bought this plant in May 2013 with a quite large bud and it took the plant about three months before it was finallty ready to open up and show me the flowers.

 

In the catt corner the Laeliocathante Meadow Bright is still flowering. Crazy girl! Who ever said cattleyas flower for a relatively short period of time? My other catts flower for 2-4 weeks and then they’re done until the next growth has matured and gone through the painstakingly slow process of developing sheaths and buds and finally flowers. Not the Meadow Bright. This plant has now been in flower for 5 months on the same spike! OK, I admit I’ve picked off a couple of wilted blossoms lately, but the bottom line is: This plant is an amazing flowerer and I should really look for more laeliocatanthes.

 

Apart from the Caularthron bicornutum that is still in flower, all the other cattleya alliance plants are busy making new growths and roots at the moment.

 

Two dendrobiums are also flowering at the moment. They are both first-time flowers for me. The weird, but wonderful, Black Mickey Mouse is still going strong. A couple of the oldest flowers have wilted, but most of the buds are open now and it has more than 20 flowers on one spike. I’m going to pollinate this one with the Dendrobium Berry ‘Oda’ that just opened up this morning. What an adorable, cute flower that is! It was love at first sight. I didn’t expect to like this plant this much, but I’m thoroughly charmed.

One of the highlights amongst the dendrobiums is not flowers, but the fact that my deciduous Dendrobium ‘Yellow Goddess’ was in fact not dead, but just asleep. The goddess is now awake and she’s got a suitable name because I spend each morning worshipping her splashing water and begging that she will keep growing and convince me that this is just her natural cycle and not caused my mistreatment.  She’s not much to take a picture of yet since her new growths are itsy bitsy tiny things.

 

And then finally….It is Ansellia africana flowering season this time of the year. The plant I purchased in flower last year has grown three new growths and have spikes on all of them. Each spike has between 20-30 flowers and some are still developing. The plant has completely taken over one of the corners in the greenhouse. It grows in all directions and have become quite a space-consuming monster. I really love the Ansellias and I’ve been wanting to get hold of one of the pure yellow ones without dots. My wish has come true! In a flask in the window sill there are small ansellia seedlings of the yellow type. I’m still going to keep them in the flask for a good while, but I’m crossing my fingers that I will manage to get them from tiny seedling size to flowering plants in some years.

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